REMEMBRANCES


FROM PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD

It is my sad duty to offer you my sincerest condolences on the passing away of my friend and mentor Harry. He influenced the life of many, including very many aspiring young journalists. In this he not only served his native country, the US, in very many ways, but more than this: he leaves an imprint on journalism as a profession in general. His inspirational work, his great knowledge of both spiritual and worldly affairs and – most of all – his humanitarian approach to the world-society did build a monument that will never been forgotten. I wish you strength in coping with this loss, which affects not only you but all whom he touched with his great charismatic personal gifts. In this I include on a personal note Catherine: without her in those first years of WPI, things certainly would have been different. I’m sure all those “outstandings” of the first group of journalists at Mac will share my sentiments. With sympathy.

N.H. (Niek) Heizenberg (WPI”62” /“63”)
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Clearly Harry’s enduring legacy is his desire and ability to bring people together to make a difference in this world…His passing will leave a large whole in our lives and yet we can rejoice in his faith and love of our Lord. We feel closer to Harry as if he is right here with us as we write this, we know he is watching over all of us. Our hearts and prayers go out to you and everyone one who knew and loved him. He taught us what a true “mastermind partner” really meant. As everyday at 12 noon regardless of location we would think of each other.

We feel so blessed to have had him in our lives. He will remain one of our heroes, indeed a mentor who has impacted every member of our family. He was so active in our lives during a time we will always cherish – when we were pregnant with our now 16 year old son – Eric Morgan Williams. Harry baptized our son, Eric. Stephen, our now 23 year old son, always enjoyed spending time with Harry in Atlanta.

We know he really is right where he deserves to be — right with the Lord in heaven. God bless Harry and your entire family during this time of grief. God’s grace to you!

Michael, Tonna, Stephen & Eric
The Williams Family

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God bless Harry’s soul, and may all of you find comfort in the memories he leaves behind. I am writing from India to say how sorry I am to hear this news. Harry’s greatness of heart and largeness of spirit, and in particular his openness to young people from faraway lands, will always remain an abiding legacy.
May his loved ones know that they are not alone in their grief. With my thoughts and prayers.
Shashi Tharoor – Former Undersecretary of the United Nations
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My prayers and thoughts are with you and the rest of the family . Your dad and mom were our first friends in MN when Jim Toscano and I brought our family here to work at Macalester and the WPI.

Harry was an amazing man; it was an honor to know him. I have many fond memories of his time in MN. I should pass some on to you.

The first few months we were in MN, we were invited to the Dean’s house for Thanksgiving…where our three children ( 3 1/2, 2 1/2 and 3 months ) were expected to be with a baby sitter. I was aghast at leaving them. Your mom & dad insisted we all come to spend the day with them at their house with you and her parents.

My husband invited Harry home to dinner with the family one day when your mom was away, and I had made a leg of lamb with gravy, mashed potatoes, broccoli and salad. Harry enjoyed some of each; and, when the others were finished, he asked if he could finish the potatoes. He poured the gravy on the bowl of potatoes and proceeded to eat all of it. He explained it reminded him of when he was young and poor and could only afford the 5 cents for potatoes and gravy. I was happy to be able to make him happy.

The first time he came back from NY to visit, I decided to make Fettuccini Alfredo, which he had enjoyed many times at The Blue Horse Restaurant where we used to take lecturers for the WPI. I was a young woman with little experience cooking unusual foods but a desire to learn. I called the Blue Horse, and the owner, Cliff Warling, gave me the recipe. It turned out to be quite simple, and Harry was delighted to know that I had made one of his favorites.

If I seem to focus on food, it’s because I feel food brings people together. I had many Macalester / WPI gatherings at my home where I did all the cooking, whether for 5 or 50 . I tried many favorites from many countries and pleased those far from home. Now I cook less because we are 2; but our combined family is large, and I love to have them all gather. I also enjoy visits from friends. I hope some time, if you are ever in St. Paul, you will come to share a meal with us. ” A guest in the home is God in the home.”

Peace be with you in your grief,
Rosemary Toscano Dosch
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I was one of the lucky persons to benefit from his foresight and generosity, and came to the U.S. for an experience of a lifetime, which literally changed my life and those of my family.

Harry’s kindness and humanity touched a great many lives all over the globe, and he will always live on in our hearts! May God bless your family!

Thai Ly -South Vietnam
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Ever since meeting Harry in 1971, I had felt that he sure did a great service to youth and internationalism in ways that have yet to be equalled.
Give us a few of him in every country and there would probably be less war … more sharing. The Romanian people were very lucky to have had him dedicated to their fates for so many years.
May the spirit in which he served live on … God knows more of it is desperately needed throughout the world.

In sorrow and with condolences,
Michael Horak
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Dear Benny,
I believe Harry’s memorial service is in session at this eletric moment and I regret not being able to be there myself. Please know, however, my soul is there to share with you the grief over his untimely demise and the joy of being one of the many WPI journalists around the world whose lives have changed thanks to our acquaintance with him.

Please accept my deepest condolences. I wish I had had the chance of seeing him again while he still was well.

Warm regards.

Ko Shioya
1966-67 World Press Institute fellow from Japan

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When Harry arrived on the Macalester campus it was, needless to say, a rather unusual hire. He wasn’t a professor, he wasn’t much older than the students, he had been sent to us by DeWitt Wallace and had been the subject of an article in the Reader’s Digest for his flood relief efforts in the Netherlands. Lo and behold, Ambassadors for Friendship appeared, with Harry talking American Motors out of some Rambler wagons to take international students on summer tours of the country. With volunteer student drivers, friends of friends willing to host the groups overnight in remote places (and a jail if nothing else was available!), and great experiences for the students, both international and domestic, the program garnered some great publicity. Of course, one of those students was Kofi Annan.

Then the World Press Institute was announced. Twelve foreign journalists would arrive on campus to spend a semester as part of the Macalester community, almost like graduate students on the campus of an undergraduate institution. Then, with the grounding provided by seminars on campus, they would scatter across the country to intern with the media and gain an understanding of how it worked in our country. Harry decided to invite a few Mac students to participate in the seminars for the journalists on campus, probably to help integrate the journalists into the Mac family and give them an additional resource for information. I was fortunate to be one of those Mac students. We “traditional” students sat in a second chair position gaining the benefits of the intense discussion between the bright and aggressive journalists and professors like Ted Mitau and invited guests like Hubert Humphrey.

By that time Harry’s external support for WPI had grown significantly. DeWitt Wallace’s support brought internationally known members of the media to WPI’s board. Hubert Humphrey gave the program an entree to the highest levels of government. And, American Motors provided some more Ramblers.

Again, I was privileged to be one of the drivers for the summer trip. Within the bounds of a few specific events on the schedule, each car -4 journalists and 2 student drivers- could determine its own itinerary. My bright idea was to get a small U-Haul trailer to carry the luggage and give us more room in the car. I built a typewriter deck for the rear-facing third seat and Nick Ulloa (Ecuador) spent most of the trip riding backwards and typing stories for La Prensa.

So, south to New Orleans, through Texas to El Paso, a tour (not under duress) of the Juarez jail at 2 AM, Grand Canyon, the Jaycee national convention in Las Vegas, Disneyland, San Francisco, Crater Lake, World’s Fair in Seattle, rough and tumble Butte, Montana, Yellowstone, Mt. Rushmore, my mom’s home cooking in Glencoe, MN and back to Mac. Rest. Then to the deep south, discussions with Hodding Carter, III at his home in Greenville, MS about race relations as we entered the 1960’s, across the south and up to Washington, meeting with JFK in the White House cabinet room arranged by Hubert, on to New York, tour Reader’s Digest, meet Lowell Thomas, concluding celebration. It would be interesting to read the impressions of all of the journalists as submitted and published in the media around the world. For us, the drivers, we saw our country through the eyes of some of the most intelligent and inquisitive people in the world.

Through all of this, Harry was an incredibly creative and energetic leader. His age allowed him to both lead and relate on a level of personal and professional equality with the journalists. He had a finely tuned sense of what would interest the group and what they should see for their own understanding and development. And, his ability to network, to work his contacts, to gain entry, was unparalleled. The high point, undoubtedly, was the White House visit. Notwithstanding all of the efforts of Harry and Hubert, there was never certainty that the appointment would not be interrupted by more pressing business. But there he was, Jack with all of his charm and candor. The journalists loved it, and baby Howard in his mother’s arms seemed happy as well! Somewhere I have a photo of the event.

I am sure that the several months that the first WPI group spent with the program had a great influence on their lives, just as I think Kofi’s experience with Macalester, with Ambassadors for Friendship and with Harry had a great influence on the direction he took in life. I know that over the past 45 years Harry has had several more causes and adventures that embellish his legacy for all of us. But, from my personal experience and perspective, I think that the memorial for Harry is the accomplishments of those he influenced, of Kofi and of the members of the WPI program whose visibility, prestige and recognitions can be in no small way traced to Harry. The world will miss him.

Please convey my condolences and best wishes to your family and to any of the WPI fraternity and Macalester community who attend the memorial

Dean Edstrom
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I received the sad news about Harry (your dad?) from Mircea Opris, my batchmate in 1999 in the World Press Institute program. Just want to extend my prayers and condolences from my little corner of the world to you and your family.

I also just want to let you know how grateful I am that Harry thought of putting together WPI. I’m sure that the countless other journalists who went on this extraordinary program through the decades feel the same way. Even if only for this, Harry left such a lasting legacy. I always look back to my WPI experience with fondness, for all the experiences we underwent, the lessons we learned and of course all the people that we met. And I’m glad our batch had a chance to meet Harry when we were in the States.

Anyway, if ever you find yourself in the Philippines someday, please feel free to contact me through this address.

Sincerely,
Susan A. de Guzman
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I’m sorry to hear about Harry and would like to thank you for looking after him in his later years. I know that my mother would have appreciated it because she looked after him in his younger years. I’m not sure if you remember me but when Harry and you came to California you stayed at my mother’s house with my sister Patty I met you at that time. Harry was my Uncle and I have some very fawn memoirs of him.

Please know that my thoughts and prayers are with you and your family and if I can do anything to help please let me know.

Sincerely
Kathy Prescott and family
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We wish sincere condolences from the Arapamesu’s president Sister Mary Rose Christy for the one who was our dearest and closest friend Harry Morgan. Arapamesu’s staff is next to you and your souls in this difficult moment when our beloved friend had passed away. We had the chance and met him and we appreciated all his work and changes that made during his life.

Respectfully, Ranf Ioan and Arapamesu’s staff.

Ranf Ioan
Director
ARAPAMESU Romania

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Harry did make a big difference in a lot of lives. He brought a charming, upbeat inspiration to every encounter. I feel lucky to have known him.

Do you know if someone is handling getting an obituary to the newspapers in the U.S. in cities where he had friends? I don’t know enough of the details of his life to write that obituary myself, but I’d be happy to help edit or to figure out whether it should be sent.

Let me know if I can help. I’m sure these days are very hard for you.

Sheilah Kast
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Great sadness for a friend of 57 years. Harry was an original. I was never quite sure what he wanted from life but it’s certain he did.
I wish you and his boys and his family peace at this very difficult time.
Tom Parks, Carmel-by-the-Sea, California.
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Dear Benny,
Thank you for including me in the notice of this sad news. I was friends with Harry only briefly through his dear friend Roger Rasbach. When Harry could not serve as the trustee to Roger’s estate, he asked me to take on that responsibility. I am grateful for his trust in me.

Harry made an incredible contribution to my life by endorsing a magazine launch I started several years ago. I will always remember his generosity and confidence in the success of my venture.

Interestingly, Harry has been on my mind a lot over the last several months. I wish I had called him. I am sorry I didn’t. I guess I’ll meet up with him in my meditations now.

Thanks again for the news. All my condolences to you and your family.

Donna Mosher
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I was very saddened to hear of Harry’s passing.

Harry’s good works did touch many people through his work in the numerous organizations he founded – World Press Institute, Friendship Ambassadors… Personally, he opened the world to me in many ways. I traveled with my university choir to Poland with Friendship Ambassadors, joined the Peace Corps to work overseas, worked for Friendship Ambassadors and now have my own agency. I doubt that I would be where I am now working in international cultural exchange if Harry did not do his pioneering work.

It was very special that Harry came out to hear our group at the Opera House and share dinner with us, particularly given his health. He presented me with a beautiful pencil drawing of downtown Timisoara and I have hung it over my office computer and look at it each day.

Sincerely,

Sean P. Fagan
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My friend at Macalester College, Dave Lanegran, has just informed me of Harry’s death.

Harry had an important impact on my life, not least because of the welcome to –and the many activities in — International House. On my first Christmas there he had me carve my first turkey! And it was there that I met Dick Eaton, who became a close friend and, later, my best man!

Harry invited me to participate in the Ambassadors for Friendship in the summer of 1961. That stands as one of the benchmarks in my life, for my eyes were opened not just to the amazing qualities of the US and Americans but also to myself. I remain deeply grateful for that amazing experience.

I was often in their house, with other foreign students and also with the newspaper writers during their terms of residence. Harry took a close interest in me while I was at Macalester, as he did with numerous others.

I am glad to have known Harry and am deeply grateful for the many direct and indirect ways he influenced my life.

Cheers,
David Knight
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I don’t know you and I didn’t know Harry. I have been on the board for 6 years, first from Ford Motor Company, which has supported WPI since the early 1960s. The first 18 years of my career were in newspapers around the U.S.

As I told Eric on the phone, I have been deeply immersed in trying to revive the great organization that Harry founded. In doing that, we have dug up many letters and stories about the early days of WPI. I have read them thoroughly and I am amazed. What Harry did was nothing short of unbelievable. I am hoping that we can continue his legacy with a revitalized and stronger WPI that can function in the 21st Century.

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family. This is a very sad day for WPI, for journalists around the world and for the many other people Harry touched.

God bless.

Regards,
Ron Iori
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I am a journalism trainer who had the great pleasure of meeting Harry in Timisoara in 2002, I was in Romania on a Knight International Press Fellowship assigned to the Center for Independent Journalism in Bucharest. I only knew Harry for a few hours, but the power of his grace and gentleness has remained with me ever since. You are a very lucky man to have shared his life as you have, and he to have shared yours. His wife laid out a wonderful dinner which included pickled radishes. Please tell her I remember her and all of the hospitality so well, because it was so special. I am teaching in Colorado, and I regret that I am unable to attend the service. But my thoughts will be with you both. Thank you so, so much for letting me know of Harry’s passing. I hope you will keep in touch. My warmest regards and condolences.

Doug Cosper
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I was saddened to hear that Harry had made his transition. We at Unity Community Church were not aware of his passing. I realize that the former minister, Rev. Elizabeth, had a personal connection and through her wishes we have continued to support his ministry. For the work of Spirit that Harry Morgan did, we give thanks and know that his spirit is at peace. Know that our thoughts will be with you on Wednesday, which is our prayer service day and we will be holding a special prayer in his remembrance. We send our condolence to his family and friends. Blessings to you all.

In Love and Light, Rev. Irene Whitmore
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This is Reverend Joann Landreth with Association of Unity Churches International. Harry and I were colleagues with great respect for each other as well as friends.

I am saddened by the loss of dear Harry. I know that you and members of his Unity group grieve this loss as well. I pray with all of you. God is your constant companion always and especially as you deal with this emotional pain. Let God’s love, peace, strength, and inspiration well up from within to comfort you, fill you with peace and strengthen and inspire you as you go through the days ahead. There is no spot where God is not and that presence is within each person and within your Dad on that invisible side.

Harry would come to Lee’s Summit when his health allowed and he would present $100.00 to me for our Association work–how thrilled I always was to see him and to realize the amount of the gift was huge for Romanian folks. When his illness prevented him from coming, he would send that $100.00 with a Youth of Unity person coming here with a note for me as well. How I treasured the love from Harry, the giving and love from members of the group and to realize what a great ministry was developed there with great spiritual growth for members of the group.

I can only say that Harry will be missed, and I say to Harry in that invisible realm and to the members of the group “well done good and faithful servants” and keep on loving God, keep serving God and you continue to be richly blessed.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do in the outer, and know that we are one with you in Spirit celebrating the bright light that is Harry Morgan.

God bless you all. In confident prayer,

Joann Landreth
A very, very sad news.
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Harry made a big difference in my life and in the life of many people. What I owe him is beyond words. He was a very close friend.

Un abrazo muy fuerte

Tonito
Antonio Rodríguez Villar
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Tonito Villar (WPI 1961-62) has asked me to write something on behalf of the inaugural World Press Institute fellows for Harry’s memorial service. I haven’t been able to reach every WPI 61-62 colleague for a formal endorsement of this, of course, but I doubt that they’d object to this being read in their name.

Meantime, my deepest condolences. Harry really was someone special.

Best regards,
Tony Paul
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Thank you for inviting me to Harry’s funeral. I enjoyed very much the few times we met. But there always was— and surely always will be — memories at The World Press Institute and with the many WPI Fellows he worked with. I very much enjoyed my several years at WPI and I always find yet another reason to be thankful for Harry’s leadership there.

Sincerely yours,

John Hodowanic
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We have lost a great story teller and a wonderful friend. I will always remember Harry sitting in his chair with a scotch in his hand telling his fantastic stories.

I don’t know if you remember my wife Angela and I. We came and taught at Tibiscus for a week in November of 2000. We had a wonderful time and appreciated all of your help.

I have been writing a book about my experiences living in Romania. It is a long way from finished but I have attached a story about Timisoara and Harry to this email. You are welcome to use any part of this for the memorial but please don’t distribute it for anything else.

“…..At lunch we finally met our host. Harry Morgan. Not the gruff but lovable TV colonel from M.A.S.H., this Harry Morgan was a retired journalist and Fulbright scholar teaching journalism at Tibiscus University. He had grown-up in Salinas, California, an Okie from the wrong side of the tracks. He was forced to learn the value of hard work and determination at an early age. Not the most physically gifted of children, Harry used the abilities he had. He found his calling as a writer and journalist. In the 1970’s, at the height of the cold war, Harry had made a name for himself. He was the Eastern European Bureau Chief for Reader’s Digest. Harry had close ties to many of the powerful people in the region. He was a sometime friend, more often acquaintance, of the Ceau]escu’s. He still had a silver tea set he was given as a wedding present by the couple. While we ate lunch he told a story about bear hunting with the dictator. They had been out for a few hours. Ceau]escu had taken a few shots while Harry and his entourage of bodyguards and lackeys stood beside him. He asked Harry why he didn’t take a shot.
Harry told him, “I’m not very good. I don’t think I would hit anything.”
Ceausescu pushed the rifle toward Harry. “How will you know if you don’t shoot?”
“I am worried I will miss. I might, I might shoot you.” Harry joked.
Silence. Everyone stood still. “Not funny!” barked Ceausescu. The hunt was over.

…………. That evening Harry threw a welcome dinner for us with some of the professors from Tibiscus. Harry was treated like royalty by all of them. He didn’t seem to mind. He sat in his big chair telling stories while his guests politely stood around him listening. No one took a seat. No one was offered a drink. Occasionally Harry would ask Benny or his wife to refill his scotch glass. Angela and I stood with the rest and listened quietly while he wove his tales.

Harry denied he was a name-dropper but he was. It didn’t matter. His stories were good enough to overlook this stroke of ego. He told us of the time he was chewed out by Mother Teresa. Helping her serve Christmas dinner in India. Harry was in charge of dessert. He was told to only give each person one orange and three chocolate kisses. When Harry saw the sweet faces of the children he couldn’t resist giving more. Mother Teresa confronted him and explained that there would not be enough for everyone if he continued. He obeyed and gave out the requisite number while Mother Teresa watched him closely. She saw his anguish at wanting to give more and finally said to him, “You can give more if you like.”

His best story was of United Nations president Kofi Anan. Harry had known him since Kofi was a high school exchange student living in the United States. Harry took him to a dinner near the beginning of Kofi’s stay. When the meal was over and Harry and Kofi were leaving Kofi turned to the hosts and said “Thank you for your hostility.”
Harry let it go until they were outside. “I believe the word you were looking for is hospitality.”
“One moment please,” said Kofi. He returned to the house and rang the bell. When the door opened he smiled at his hosts. “I believe I made a mistake. I want to thank you for your hospitality,” Kofi paused and then added, “and your hostility.”
We will not be able to attend the service but please keep in touch with us.

Thank you, Bill & Angela Owen
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As I reflect on our friend, I think how privileged I was to have known Harry for such a long time. It all begin in Kansas City when he was with Unity School of Christianity and our friendship has brought so much good into my life. I never met anyone with so much to offer to another. I remember reading his stories in Reader’s Digest and how inspirational those articles were to me.
All of the remaining family can be assured of Harry’s legacy to the world and what he left behind.
There is so much to my personal relationship to Harry that I will always remember and I am so thankful for Harry to have been a part of my life.

James (Jim) C. Simpson
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I will never forget him. He was a great human being, I will miss him deeply.

I remember his speech at the memorial for my husband, the late Aurel- Dragos Munteanu, last year in Cluj and I am still moved by his warmth and friendship.

I forwarded your email to my son, Tudor Munteanu. He is the webmaster for the website dedicated to Aurel- Dragos Munteanu. He will be able to place an announcement on the website www.marileiubiri.org so please check with us later.

Best regards,
Ileana Munteanu, NYC.
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please accept my heartfelt condolences. I first met Harry shortly after the foundation of WPI, and have been a member in good standing of the Harry Morgan Fan Club ever since. He was truly a good man. May he rest in peace.

Claude Erbsen
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Thank you for your email telling me of Harry’s passing. My heart goes out to you and your family in your loss. May God bless you.

Harry has been a very dear friend of mine and though I have not seen Harry in many years I have kept him in my thoughts and prayers. I have great love and respect for Harry. I am grateful for all of the many and wonderful contributions Harry has made toward making this a better world.

I have visited with Harry in Timisoara and I have fond memories of the Universities, our travels up into the Alps, going to the Opera, dining in the most wonderful restaurant and visiting and speaking with his friends.

May Harry rest in peace.

Namaste, Joyce
Rev. Dr. Joyce Rennolds – “Motivator of One or A Thousand”

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We have treasured memories of Harry and the wide circle of friends he brought into our lives in Timisoara. Please keep us apprised of memorial plans.
Fondly, Kathy Martin
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Harry was one of our dearest friends and benefactor during our years with him at Macalester and International House in St.Paul.

It is strange that I sent an e-mail on Oct 29th to Ted Miller, who is one of Harry´s old friends, to ask him about Harry´s health since we had not heard from him for a while. That was the day Harry passed away. I must have received an early warning.

We will miss Harry very much. He was always very close to us and our friendship lasted all the way from 1960 until his dying day. He was a unique person who dedicated himself to helping others help themselves.

We send to you and all the Morgan family our deepest sympathy at this time. We will always keep his memory a life in our memories of good old days.

Please keep us posted about the funeral, even though we do not have a chance to be present.Warmest regards,

Áslaug and Jón Hákon Magnússon
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Your loss is our loss. Please tell Margaretta that my thoughts go out to her at this time.

I was in Salinas with Ed and Helen when we got your e-mail. Howard called the next morning. Eric Brazil wrote a nice article about Harry in the Californian that was printed on October 31st.

Once again, my sincerest sympathy. His spirit lives on in our memories of him.

Cousin Pat
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I have attached a copy of the email that went out to all of our Unity ministers with the notice of your father’s transition. I know that you miss him and I know that you rejoice that he continues his spiritual adventure without physical constraints, (as we all do) within the Presence of love itself. Blessing you with our prayers, Corri

Corri Hart
Ministry Employment Assistant
Association of Unity Churches International

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My name is Yvon Russell, son of Betty Russell in suburban Detroit in the U.S. On behalf of my family I want to express our condolences to you and your family for your loss. My mother and Harry spent some time growing up together and my mother holds fond memories of her youth and Harry as well as admiration for all that Harry accomplished.
What a coincidence that after years of not being in contact with each other, my mom reached out to Harry with help from me and Google. It had to be just before Harry got sick. Harry responded with a kind note and they planned to speak via phone. Unfortunately they never got the chance.

My mother was rather upset by the episode and as a result we all learned a valuable lesson, never put off what you can do today until tomorrow. If you have any insight as to what Harry has been doing the past 20 years or so my mother would so appreciate any memories you may be able to share with us some day.

Benny, thank-you so much for your communication with us. Godspeed to you and your family.

Sincerely,

Yvon Russell
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Harry Morgan obit. – By Eric Brazil
Harry W. Morgan, founder of the World Press Institute and Ambassadors for Friendship, mentor of former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan and protege of Eleanor Roosevelt, died last week in Timisoara, Romania. I had hoped to read his obituary in the New York Times, but so far, nothing. I have only one tenuous contact at the times (David Cay Johnston), so I am sending this note to you hoping that you will forward it to whoever is in charge of obits.

Morgan was an original, and a feature story written in the mid 1950s by the late great Times reporter Meyer Berger explains why. He was a poor Okie boy from Salinas who virtually raised himself, had a flash of global fame during the great North Sea Flood of 1953, when as a teenager he promoted a trip to the Netherlands to participate in the relief effort.

During the Cold War, the hundreds of Friendship Ambassadors music and cultural groups — mostly high school and college age — promoted the U.S.throughout the Iron Country. (Friendship Ambassadors still exists.) The World Press Institute at Macalester College provided fellowships for more than 500 journalists, who now occupy editors chairs throughout the world.

Morgan’s last years were spent as a professor of journalism in Timisoara, Romania.
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I recently learned of the passing of Mr. Morgan, founder of the World Press Institute. I am sad, very sad. I was in the WPI Class of ’98 and met Mr. Morgan once during the program. He came across as a man who cared for all persons; it is no surprise that the organization he founded, WPI, dedicated itself to the development of journalists throughout the entire world.
My heartfelt condolences go out to members of the family of this great man. He will be missed by all of humanity.

Akeem Soboyede, JD, Esq.
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Today we’ll light a candle to mourn and remember our beloved Grandfather and Father in Law. We’ll remember with smiling faces but tearful eyes his wonderful, inspirational acts. We’ll laugh at his crazy antics that at the time may have caused us to shake our heads or throw up our hands in frustration. But most of all, we’ll hope to indelibly burn the sound of his voice into our memories. His craft for story telling was one of his great gifts, and one he shared globally to make a genuine difference. Listening to one of his impassioned stories, and they were all always passionate, was like listening to a dance as he started slow, then sped things up twirling his listeners through it. But it was always the ending that got you, his booming voice descending through octaves while his face contorted into a bugged out eye. The kids would run in gleeful fear and you, like any adult within in ear shot, were mesmerized and couldn’t wait to hear another first-hand Harry Morgan zinger.

So it’s with great sadness that our young children won’t get to hear more of these from the master himself. We’ll take comfort in knowing that they know he believed that the mountains look like golden elephants lying down to sleep, and that one of his favorite songs, Jan Janssen, is their favorite song. It helps too that they always ask, when were in Salinas, if those were the fields Grandpa Morgan worked in as a boy. His stories will live on. And hopefully as they grow they’ll learn more stories and feel inspired to pick up the needles to mend and darn the global fabric of society that Harry was such an integral part of weaving.
We’ll miss you and love you always.

Marie, Kylie Will and Pippa
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I have been thinking a lot about you and Kip since hearing from Benny that your dad had died. I hope that by the time you check email you will have received the message I just left on your cell phone. In any case, I want to say thank you again for taking the time to call. David Drinkwater, Ida Faiella, Alice (Stroh) Forsyth, Linda Mercer and others have expressed interest in some kind of state-side event to honor and remember your dad so please keep in touch about that and feel free to let me know if we can be of any help in organizing, spreading the word, etc.
One thing that occured to me – is anyone preparing something for the NY Times? If I can help either with an announcement or with trying to get an obituary I’d be glad to do so.
Harry was such a world citizen that many of us felt close to him as our lives were influenced by him in some way. He seems to have “belonged” to all of us. But in the flurry of accolades and honors I can’t help but remember that you are his family. So you and Kip and your families will be especially in our thoughts today.
Love, Jon Mills
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Jonathan Thompson, my brother and long time WPI supporter, forwarded your recent e-mail announcing your father’s death. I knew him well for a very brief period of time. He was an extraordinary flash of brilliance. And I regret hearing of his death. I send my condolences.

I grew up close to DeWitt and Lila Wallace. I am now 66, and have had a successful career in banking/finance in New York having retired from being CEO of a large bank. But, in 1959, I was a freshman at Columbia College, and had grown up the son of the only family member working at the Reader’s Digest. I saw the Wallaces almost every day as a child, visited them all the time and they were my Godparents. In 1959, they introduced me to Harry who had put Ambassadors for Friendship together the year before. I helped in year 2, and Harry and I managed four trips in the summer of 1960. We collaborated in the organization and support program that year with your Dad doing the heavy lifting. My two trips included ten students from Columbia, Cambridge University (UK) and Macalester. The trips were a huge success. Two guys went on to be ambassadors for their countries with one becoming a foreign minister, one American went on to be President of the Minneapolis FED, a vice Chair at General Mills, and CEO of the Times Mirror Corporation. Others turned into dentists, farmers, travel agents, ministers. But, all were greatly influenced by seeing America as it was at the time. We visited the Sloans (General Motors) in Detroit, a wildcat oil family in a Wyoming mobile home, a state senator living across the street from Central High School in Little Rock as integration exploded on the national scene etc. etc. One Greek Macalester student was a Casanova and he laughed at our visits to families across America: “they saw me as a Greek God when we arrived and a God Damn Greek when we left.” Twenty years later, the wife in a Salt Lake City family that we visited still went to Athens every summer to see him. It was a lively, innovative, brilliant program. It showed the students that America had many building blocks, and that the cold-heat/black-white of St Paul or Harlem were not America….only a slice. I understand that WPI had similar base concepts and that the leverage of newspapers only magnified the impact of such programs.

Anyway, I lost touch with Harry and saw him once or twice in the late in the 1960s and that was about it. Family fights led to Dad departing the Reader’s Digest in 1970 for a bigger career at the New York Times, and that put a permanent slice through the fragile Wallace family. The family planned for me to join the magazine after Harvard Business School, and a solid experience elsewhere. I worked as Circulation Director at Newsweek International at the time, but at 29 gave it up moving to Wall Street (I couldn’t continue when Dad quit due to personal Wallace whim) I saw Lila 4-8 times a year thereafter until she died in 1983 and Wally rarely. I always asked about your Dad. I suspect that they were not his friend in the fullness of their relationship. But, that was the Wallaces. Your Dad was properly motivated at the base, brilliant, and an excellent promoter of outstanding concepts. I will always remember him in the glory of the Ambassadors for Friendship flash. It was spectacular, and well deserved.

All the best,

Jeff (Geoffrey A. Thompson)
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I am truly sorry for your loss. While I never met your father, I have
nothing but great things about him. I have been a supporter of the WPI for the 15 years I’ve been at Mac. I was a host family in the late 1980s.

We would like to publish an obituary in our campus publications, but we wanted input from the family. At your earliest convenience, could you send me what you would include about your father.
Thank you for your consideration. Again, our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

Doug Stone, Director, College Relations Macalester College
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Howard, I empathize with your feelings on the passing of your dad, having just buried my father in law and having a now frail father myself…I know how much you respected your father, and how much you will miss him. As Bill has suggested we would be happy to help spread some of his ashes here off the boat, perhaps out at sea, or by the opera house…

All best to you , your brother and Ginger at this time, Joe – (Joseph Skrzynski)
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My name is Alex and I was a friend of your father’s – I worked with him in the mid 1990’s before I left Romania to move to the United States.

Please receive my condolences for your loss. Harry was a man of vision and he was aware that he made a difference in the life of many – and knowing him, he was probably just planning something else, figuring out how to top what he had already done.

Unfortunately, today we had to do his obituary, and as it happens, even though I am away from Romania I was helping out a new colleague who just joined us there and I was shocked to receive Harry’s obit for editing.

Anyway, here is the story, and if you would like to add a few words we can still update it in the current news cycle. Some pictures of Harry would also be useful to go with the story. Patrick gave me a couple that he had, but not sure they can be used as they are not very clear.

Founder of World Press Institute dies
Harry W. Morgan, founder of World Press Institute, dies in Romania BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) _ American journalist Harry W. Morgan, who interviewed Mother Teresa, John F. Kennedy and Indira Gandhi, started
cultural exchange programs across the Iron Curtain and taught generations of journalists their art, died Tuesday in the western Romanian city of Timisoara, his son Benny said. He was 73.
Morgan died of a heart attack, three weeks after he was admitted to
a hospital with breathing problems. During an almost 50-year journalism career working for Reader’s Digest, Morgan traveled to more than 100 countries and interviewed numerous presidents and personalities, among them Mother Teresa, Eleanor Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, Elvis Presley and Ernest Hemingway. To interview Mother Teresa, Morgan spent several weeks as a volunteer in Calcutta’s hospitals.
In 1961, he founded the World Press Institute, which provides
fellowships for foreign journalists from around the world to spend
time living and working in the United States.
He also founded the Friendship Ambassadors Foundation, which
promotes cultural exchanges around the world and was one of the few
Western organizations operating beyond the Iron Curtain, including in
then-communist Romania.
Morgan mentored former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who
crisscrossed America with Morgan in a donated Rambler wagon in 1960.
Morgan advised him to pursue a career with the United Nations.
Morgan moved to Romania in 1994, when the Romanian government
invited him to assist in the development of journalism schools at the
universities of Bucharest, Sibiu and Timisoara at a time when
Romania’s free press was still in its infancy.
For the past 11 years he had lived in Timisoara, in western
Romania, where he taught at the university and set up a journalism
club and an American library. He was made an honorary citizen of the
city.
Morgan first came to Romania in the 1970s, when he met and
interviewed communist president Nicolae Ceausescu. His visit resulted
in the setting-up of Romanian-American cultural exchanges, for which
he was awarded Romania’s Cultural Merit distinction.
In an interview with Romanian magazine “Formula AS,” Morgan said he
was fascinated with Romania because of the “moral beauty” of its
villages, where people would put the last of their food on the table
for their guest.
“Harry was a firm believer in the need for understanding between
people of all nations, and in establishing the World Press Institute
he sought to build a multiplier effect by exposing foreign journalists
to the United States, ‘warts and all’ as he put it,” said Claude E.
Erbsen, a member of the World Press Institute board of director and
retired vice president of The Associated Press.
Benny Morgan, one of Morgan’s two adopted Romanian sons, said he
used to greet his students at the beginning of his course with a
sentence that summed up his creed: “As a journalist, you can make a
difference in your life and the lives of others”.
Morgan is survived by his wife, Margareta, and four sons.”

Best regards,
Alexandru Alexe
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There are so few of us left. I’ve let Bill, Tommy and Mom know. I’ll call Tom Morgan after my next lecture. Roger was the friend from Houston? I met several of Harry’s colleagues when I stayed with him in Atlanta during a holiday from grad school. John’s (my baby brother) wedding is Saturday, I will be in New York on Tuesday through Friday for the American Indian College Fund event.
Please send us the obituary, I’ll send it to the Duncan Banner. There are still a few old timers that remember the Morgans around Stephens County. Y’all take care, let me know if you will be in NY at the same time.
Best, Bret (Steve Densen)

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I, was saddened to hear of Harry Waynes passing. First Daddy, 1977, then Logan 3 years ago, then Edith, then my mother, then Harry Wayne. I, had a dream the day before he passed. Symbolic in nature. Thus, the news when it came was not as harsh as it would have been without the compensation dream. Ritual aids much in the closing processes involved in remembering someone at their time of death.

I, recall when I was not quite 2 years old standing at the legs of a man who was wearing brown dress pants. Thinking how odd those pants looked. And I couldn’t even look up to see who was wearing those brown pants. I just knew it was someone I did not really know that well, BUT he was my oldest brother. With that realization I, accepted the person who was wearing those brown odd looking, feeling pants.

Harry’s favorite treat as a young boy was Soda pop mixed up with Strawberry Ice cream. And, there was Logan who LOVED Onions and light bread. I will have you in my prayers that day. Anything I can do, let me know. Love, to all

Johnny Morgan
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Dear Howard,
Please accept my deep regrets for the dear lost of your father.
I have never met him but we had a short correspondence in my capacity of WPI 1996 Felow.
I must say that WPI was great cause which changed entierly my professional and personal life for ever. I have always said this and it could be easily seen in my career in the past 11 years.
Thanks to WPI a created contacts, accepted knowledge and experience, formed spirit which helps me and encourages mew a lot in all these years. I told the same last year when WPI invited me on the Transperancy Reporting Seminar 10 years later.
I wish WPI idea existed forever and Harry’s spirit together with it. Thank you, Harry, for inventing this great idea, which reunited journalists from all over the World and gave us better knowledge for the USA.
May you rest in peace.
If any of Harry’s followers need any help from Bulgaria – pls do not hesitate to contact me.
Sincerely
Alexenia Dimitrova
24 Hours Daily
47, Tsarigradsko Shosse
Sofia, Bulgaria 1504

_____________________
Please know that my warmest thoughts are with you at this sad time. You gave to Harry all of the love, devotion and care for which he sought all of his life. Your hearts should be at peace for having done and given so very much.
I pray that soon you are able to focus on the wonderful memories which Harry gave to all of us. I pray that all of us can use constructively his shining example of supreme effrort to implement a humanitarian philosophy on a global level. He loved the world, individually and collectively. His greatest legacy to each and all is the inspiration to grow that love in our own lives.

My thoughts and love will remain with you all in Romania.
Catharine Morgan Westlake
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Dear Benny,

please accept my heartfelt condolences. I first met Harry shortly after the foundation of WPI, and have been a member in good standing of the Harry Morgan Fan Club ever since. He was truly a good man. May he rest in peace.

Claude
_____________________
My friend at Macalester College, Dave Lanegran, has just informed me of Harry’s death.

Harry had an important impact on my life, not least because of the welcome to –and the many activities in — International House. On my first Christmas there he had me carve my first turkey! And it was there that I met Dick Eaton, who became a close friend and, later, my best man!

Harry invited me to participate in the Ambassadors for Friendship in the summer of 1961. That stands as one of the benchmarks in my life, for my eyes were opened not just to the amazing qualities of the US and Americans but also to myself. I remain deeply grateful for that amazing experience.

I was often in their house, with other foreign students and also with the newspaper writers during their terms of residence. Harry took a close interest in me while I was at Macalester, as he did with numerous others.

I am glad to have known Harry and am deeply grateful for the many direct and indirect ways he influenced my life.

Cheers,
David Knight
_____________________
Benny,

I just wanted to personally thank you for all of the love and care you have put into Harry and the family over the past three weeks (and many years!). It has been a hard time and your amazing efforts have been phenomenal. I know it was a great comfort to Howard to have you there. He and Kip are looking forward to celebrating Harry’s awesome life with you and morning all of our loss.

I am especially grateful that you included our family in your wedding and that we were able to have those treasured days with Harry, Margaret, Georgie, Romona and you. I am sending Howard with many wonderful pictures of your wedding, the dinners at Harry’s apartment, and the dinner the night before the wedding. We have pictures of Harry enjoying and being part of it all. It was fitting that the final picture had him dressed in his red bow tie — saved for special occassions!

Yesterday the children, Howard, and I had a lovely family service at our church with one of our ministers. We all dressed in Red and Black in honor of Harry’s beloved red bow tie, both boys wore boy ties. Reed wrote and read a wonderful eulogy, Catie made a poster of pictures of Harry with our family and her favorite memories of their times together, Andrew read a few bible versus, Howard gave a talk, and I read a poem and gave Memories. Connie our beloved pastor of 15 years said prayers and read versus. It was a great way to honor Harry’s passing. Afterwards we went out to Morton’s, a steak house Harry enjoyed often with Howard. The children ate oysters (a first for my kids) and steak — two of Harry’s favorite items. We told stories about Harry from every 5 years of Howard’s life. It was a great way for our family to celebrate and morn the passing of a great man and grandfather.

The children and I are sorry we will not be joining you for the funeral, but we thought this was a time for Howard, Kip and you to really focus on Harry’s passing and its implications. You are with us hourly in our prayers.

Thank you again for being such a treasure for the family in this time of crisis. I am very sorry for your loss and ours.

Ginger Morgan
_____________________
As I reflect on our friend, I think how privileged I was to have known Harry for such a long time. It all begin in Kansas City when he was with Unity School of Christianity and our friendship has brought so much good into my life. I never met anyone with so much to offer to another. I remember reading his stories in Reader’s Digest and how inspirational those articles were to me.
All of the remaining family can be assured of Harry’s legacy to the world and what he left behind.
There is so much to my personal relationship to Harry that I will always remember and I am so thankful for Harry to have been a part of my life.

James (Jim) C. Simpson
_____________________
Good morning Benny

Thank you for your e-mail even though the message was a very very sad one. Harry was one of our dearest friends and benefactor during our years with him at Macalester and International House in St.Paul.

It is strange that I sent an e-mail on Oct 29th to Ted Miller, who is one of Harry´s old friends, to ask him about Harry´s health since we had not heard from him for a while. That was the day Harry passed away. I must have received an early warning.

We will miss Harry very much. He was always very close to us and our friendship lasted all the way from 1960 until his dying day. He was a unique person who dedicated himself to helping others help themselves.

We send to you and all the Morgan family our deepest sympathy at this time. We will always keep his memory a life in our memories of good old days.
Please keep us posted about the funeral, even though we do not have a chance to be present.

Warmest regards,

Áslaug and Jón Hákon Magnússon
_____________________
To Howard and Kipper
Before Harry came, Macalester was just a good college. Once he settled on the campus, he aroused, stimulated and made many students’ dreams come true. I was one of the lucky ones chosen to go on the Ambassadors for Friendship tour. It was a great experience to see America. It is sad that Harry had to go so soon. My deepest condolence to you.
Keek in Tokyo
_____________________
Dear Benny,

I believe Harry’s memorial service is in session at this eletric moment and I regret not being able to be there myself. Please know, however, my soul is there to share with you the grief over his untimely demise and the joy of being one of the many WPI journalists around the world whose lives have changed thanks to our acquaintance with him.

Please accept my deepest condolences. I wish I had had the chance of seeing him again while he still was well.

Warm regards.

Ko Shioya
1966-67 World Press Institute fellow from Japan

____________________-
Yes, Jon … and Benny …

Ever since meeting Harry in 1971, I had felt that he sure did a great service to youth and internationalism in ways that have yet to be equalled.

Give us a few of him in every country and there would probably be less war … more sharing. The Romanian people were very lucky to have had him dedicated to their fates for so many years.

May the spirit in which he served live on … God knows more of it is desperately needed throughout the world.
Thank you for sharing this (albeit bad) news.

In sorrow and with condolences,

Michael
____________________
Dear Mr. Morgan (Benny),

I received the sad news about Harry (your dad?) from Mircea Opris, my batchmate in 1999 in the World Press Institute program. Just want to extend my prayers and condolences from my little corner of the world to you and your family.

I also just want to let you know how grateful I am that Harry thought of putting together WPI. I’m sure that the countless other journalists who went on this extraordinary program through the decades feel the same way. Even if only for this, Harry left such a lasting legacy. I always look back to my WPI experience with fondness, for all the experiences we underwent, the lessons we learned and of course all the people that we met. And I’m glad our batch had a chance to meet Harry when we were in the States.

Anyway, if ever you find yourself in the Philippines someday, please feel free to contact me through this address.

Sincerely,
Susan A. de Guzman
_____________________
Dear Benny,

It saddens me deeply to hear of Harry’s passing. Please accept my sincere condolences!

I was one of the lucky persons to benefit from his foresight and generosity, and came to the U.S. for an experience of a lifetime, which literally changed my life and those of my family.

Harry’s kindness and humanity touched a great many lives all over the globe, and he will always live on in our hearts!

May God bless your family!

Thai Ly
South Vietnam

_____________________
Harry had been given a frame containing an autograph of Robert Frost’s and the poem’s last four lines. These say…

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Because you chose not to lead an everyday life, Harry, we have all benefited in ways unimaginable to those 12 young journalists of 46 years ago. We’re also aware of hundreds, indeed thousands, of so many nationalities whose lives you changed for the better.

You kept your promises. Sleep well, Harry.

-Anthony Paul
Australian WPI Fellow, 1961-62

_____________________
Please accept my heartfelt condolences. I first met Harry shortly after the foundation of WPI, and have been a member in good standing of the Harry Morgan Fan Club ever since. He was truly a good man. May he rest in peace.

Claude Erbsen
_____________________
We feel so blessed to have had him in our lives. He will remain one of our heroes, indeed a mentor who has impacted every member of our family. He was so active in our lives during a time we will always cherish – when we were pregnant with our now 16 year old son – Eric Morgan Williams. Harry baptized our son, Eric. Stephen, our now 23 year old son, always enjoyed spending time with Harry in Atlanta.
We know he really is right where he deserves to be — right with the Lord in heaven. God bless Harry and your entire family during this time of grief.
God’s grace to you!
Michael, Tonna, Stephen & Eric
The Williams Family

_____________________
I am so sorry that Harry passed away. He was a truly remarkable individual ; one of the finest humanitarians, ever. I am saddened by this event. Sincerely,
Mitzi Layne
_____________________
Greatness comes in various ways and means. It is not a title or a position. Nor is it wealth and power.

Greatness is the impact that you leave on people’s lives and those around you that make them remember you in the fondest and most sincere ways.
Harry Morgan was a great man. He had a great vision and worked hard to see it bear fruit. He impacted the lives of thousands of people around him and as far as Europe, Asia, and Africa.
In today’s world there is a growing massive need for hundreds of Harrys, who can show us that we are all the same, but live differently. To guide us to understand diversity through meeting and understanding “the other”. And most importantly -on the professional level- make us realize how can media affect our understanding of the other by either creating stereotypes and phobias or by removing barriers and obstacles.
We in the Arab world should know that better than anyone else. We see how the acts of a very very few have demonized an entire culture and religion. We also see how American foreign policy failures have increased the physical distance separating us by adding thousands of mental and psychological miles.

We should all learn from Harry Morgan.
His lesson is simple … but his legacy is great.

I share your grief over a great man, but I am sure that his memory will outlast all of us.
I am saddened that prior engagements have prevented me from joining you and Harry’s friends for his memorial.
Please accept my deepest and warmest condolences … my thoughts are with you all.

Mureed Hammad
WPI / 1985

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Dear family. It is my sad duty to offer you my sincerest condolences on the passing away of my friend and mentor Harry. He influenced the life of many, including very many aspiring young journalists. In this he not only served his native country, the US, in very many ways, but more than this: he leaves an imprint on journalism as a profession in general. His inspirational work, his great knowledge of both spiritual and worldly affairs and – most of all – his humanitarian approach to the world-society did build a monument that will never been forgotten. I wish you strength in coping with this loss, which affects not only you but all whom he touched with his great charismatic personal gifts. In this I include on a personal note Catherine: without her in those first years of WPI, things certainly would have been different. I’m sure all those “outstandings” of the first group of journalists at Mac will share my sentiments. With sympathy.

N.H. (Niek) Heizenberg (WPI”62” /“63”)
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I am writing from India to say
how sorry I am to hear this news. Harry’s greatness of heart and largeness of spirit, and in particular his openness to young people from faraway lands, will always remain an abiding legacy.

May his loved ones know that they are not alone in their grief.
with my thoughts and prayers.
Shashi Tharoor


SPEECH

HDM Memorial Service for Harry W. Morgan
January 24th, 2008

Today is my Father’s birthday – I have here his birth certificate – Harry Wayne Morgan, born January 24, 1934 at 6pm in Marlow Oklahoma to Edith Adkins Morgan and John Travis Morgan. So 74 years, to the day, from my father’s birth, we gather here to celebrate life, although it’s sadly on the occasion of his death.

Welcome. Thank you all for coming. I’d also like to recognize those who could not come – particularly my Father’s wife Margareta and adopted son George from Romania.

Like his unusual and interesting life, my father’s passing in Romania on October 29th, not quite three months ago, was a journey. On the day of his death, my wife and children and I grieved at a private service at our church, Noroton Presbyterian, in Darien. That was soon followed with a memorial service and cremation adventure in Romania.

From there, we set out to fulfill my father’s wish that his ashes be spread around the world – and I can report that he is well on the way with ashes in Bucharest, Sibu, Timisoara & elsewhere in Romania, in the Adirondack State Park in upstate NY, Orinda, Salinas, Carmel and San Francisco Harbor in California, Las Vegas and the Hoover Dam, Monterrey Mexico, Brownsville TX, on the Charles W. Morgan – the last surviving whaling ship in Mystic CT, Newport RI, Darien CT, and all around NYC – he has a February date with Sydney Harbor, our good friend Yoshi Shikano, who came all the way from Japan, will bring ashes back there tomorrow, and Dad is on his way to the sub Siberian city of Astana, in Kazakhstan, where Samar Pal, an early WPI fellow from India, will immerse Dad’s ashes in the Ishim and Ak Bulak Rivers. If anyone here would like to help in this effort, please see me or my brothers kip or Benny after the service. We hope to leave him in at least 73 places, one for each year of his life! He is here with us now.
Twelve days ago, we had a small family service in Northern California, at Point Lobos State reserve, in Carmel, where he joined his mother and great friend Roger Rashbach and Roger’s parents, whose memorials my Dad had performed there over the last 10 years.

Now we are gathered here for the final memorial, appropriately at the Unity Church, a key to my father’s spiritual journey. Over 35 years ago, my father started attending Sunday Unity services at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, led by Eric Butterworth. This center where we now are was later established by Eric and his wife Olga. In the 1980’s, my father was inspired to go to seminary at Unity Village outside Kansas City and in 1989 was ordained in a service lead by Norman Vincent Peal, Author of the Power of Positive Thinking and long time pastor of Marble Collegiate Church here in NY.

On November 20th, when I visited this center to start to plan this event, the widowed Olga Butterworth happened to be here. We stood in the vestibule, and she consoled me with certainty that my father’s journey was continuing in a new life with God. It is sad, but just after Christmas Olga died. Her memorial is this Sunday, back at Avery Fisher Hall and hopefully some of the flowers here today will be used there for that service as well. It seems that there has been a great spiritual circle and homecoming here, and it is more than appropriate for Jim Gaither to lead us in a Unity Service.

A rebirth has also occurred since my Father’s passing. Last spring, the World Press Institute which was founded by my Father in 1961, ceased operation, as it had lost the strategic support of Macalester College, where WPI was headquartered and endowed. This was heart breaking for my Dad. Remarkably, exactly one month following my Father’s death, the World Press Institute was reborn. Macalaster returned the half million dollar endowment it had been given for the Institute in the 1960’s and WPI fellows will again experience the US in 2008!

My Father prayed for this, and his prayers were answered. So I ask you now to join me in the Lord’s Prayer –

Our Father, who art in heaven
Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done
On earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
As we forgive our debtors.
Lead us not into temptation,
But deliver us from evil:
For Thine is the kingdom,
And the power,
And the glory,
Forever.
-Amen.
REMEMBERANCE

This is the fourth and final time I will publicly remember my Father, although privately and in conversation that will continue for the rest of my days. In earlier events, I recalled to my wife and children who my Father was and what he had done in life. In Romania I recalled the top 10 characteristics I saw in my father, he was:

1. Optimist and Resilient
2. Entrepreneur and promoter
3. Motivationalist
4. Journalist and communicator
5. Spiritual
6. Globalist and an Internationalist
7. Restless
8. Charitable
9. Emotional
10. People person

Finally, in California, I tried to summarize three key things my father gave me, which I see as:

1. Courage and confidence under adversity
2. Optimism
3. Loyalty to family, friends, firm and country

For this service, I won’t repeat more detail of what I’ve already said, but rather I want to make a few observations from my Dad’s life and what I think was some of his guiding philosophy.
Since my Dad’s death, I have had an epiphany about my Dad’s early days. I knew full well of his early days in Oklahoma, driving the Model T-Ford to Salinas California, his leaving home at the early age of 12 and living with friends to finish high school and going off to Holland in 1953, after his graduation, to help in the floods there. Today I wear the family heirloom from that adventure, the gold Omega watch given to my father in thanks by Queen Juliana of Holland. I know that experience in 1953 was the seed of all my father’s work – to foster better understanding between the people of the world, through personal interaction and contact – and I know in 1961 Dad graduated from Rutgers and started the World Press Institute.

I also knew my Dad was in the Air Force – but I didn’t fully appreciate just how important that experience was for him – from his draft papers arriving in 1952 to his discharge in 1961 – and all that he did in his life. In papers we’ve discovered since his death, he wrote that it was his call up to the draft that trigged him to use what free time he had after high school and go to Holland. His time in Holland was defined and made urgent by his need to return for the draft. I’m quite sure these experiences intertwined to lead him to seek placement at the military language school in Monterrey California, where he was trained in Russian and the harsh reality of the cold war. It was with the support and backing of the Air Force that he further developed his journalism skills in the press corps and that he was able to get several of his friends from Holland to visit his base in Xenia Ohio and share American experiences. Also, it was the GI Bill that paved his way to attend Rutgers University, where excelled – graduating in 3 years, becoming class President and being recognized by Life Magazine in 1962 as one of the 10 most important young men in America. In 1962, I was born, my Dad was the most important man in America for me – and even before my 1st birthday I tagged along for the fun, joining my Dad and Mom in the White House at a meeting with President Kennedy

While he lived the last 10 years of his life in Romania – which, by the way is the longest period he ever spent in one place – My Father also loved America and, I think it was that love of country that lead him to do so much abroad and prove to the rest to the world what a great country we live in.

He loved the American flag. He adorned the sanctuary of his church in Atlanta with world flags – but most prominently the American flag. He hosted a famous 4th of July party in Romania for many years. I recall as a child, being with my Dad in Poland in the mid-1970’s and being part of the first ever US State dinner hosted behind the Iron Curtain by President Ford; and the chills I had seeing the US flag fly over a palace in Warsaw. Dad was memorialized in Romania wrapped in the US flag; and he was cremated wrapped in the flag. At his cremation, he also wore a lapel pin of the US and Romanian flags intertwined like the one I’m wearing.

So it is with great honor that we have the American flag up here – given by the US Government – and that we have representatives from the US Air Force with us today to honor my Dad and the flag and finish this service with the solemn rites that every veteran earns.

When I was born, my father tells me a giant bouquet of flowers was delivered to our home from Lila Bell and DeWitt Wallace – founders of the Reader’s digest, my father’s mentors and after whom I am partially named, with my middle name DeWitt. With the flowers came a note quoting the Greek Philosopher Epictetus – as my Dad often recalled to me, the advice was: “Enjoy the good life, until habit makes it pleasant”.

Now I’ve been struggling to figure that advice out for ever, but I think it means that a “good life” is not necessarily pleasant; but, after a time, and constant repeating, the good life can become pleasant and enjoyable. I think a good life is one of hard work and that too can become pleasant – as life is a journey, not a destination.

I have learned that Epictetus was a “stoic”. If you’ll indulge a moment – I think this philosophy is instructive and worth a moment to reflect, quoting from various internet sites – stoicism espouses that

“In the life of the individual man, virtue is the sole good; such things as health, happiness, possessions, are of no account. Since virtue resides in the will, everything really good or bad in a man’s life depends only upon himself.

In the last years, my Dad has been described as an invalid, he certainly struggled with his health and chronic conditions, such as diabetes and Parkinson’s, but he always kept a happy outlook on life and his energetic curiosity.
He remained, in the words of Epictetus, “sick and yet happy, in peril and yet happy, dying and yet happy… [, in exile and happy, in disgrace and happy.]”
I think my father lead a good life – he challenged himself and tried to do good things to the end – sometime stumbling and having great disappointment – but it was a good life and, for the most part, he made the most of it at every turn. As you will hear from others, his life had a lasting influence on many, and, in particular, me.

In his will, DeWitt Wallace had a special gift for my Father. It was a red bow tie, and a note to wear it often at fun events and enjoy life. My son Reed is wearing that tie today.

My father used to love to say “Today is the first Day of the rest of your life!” And I try to treat each day with that kind of excitement and optimism. Thank you Dad – I love you and miss you.

Howard Dewitt Morgan
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Who was Harry!
I will call my small speech today “Who was Harry”. Most of the people today knew Harry W. Morgan, but I just wanted to remind you of some little of what he was…or was for me.

First of all, his name was Harry. When called upon… like Professor Morgan, or Mr. Morgan… Harry used to say: who? Mr. Morgan? Mr. Morgan is my father… My father’s dead. …My name is Harry… and he stayed like this for me even now. So, I hope you won’t mind if I refer to him as he wanted.

He was a Giver. Harry’s boss, the founder of Reader’s Digest, DeWitt Wallace, told him this: “you are lucky or fortunate if you could live 75 years. 75 years is a full, productive life. And he said the first 25 years of life you should devote your time, effort, energy to learning as much as you possibly can. You should spend the second 25 years doing, earning that what you have been trained to do. The third 25 years should be devoted to giving back something of yourself, returning some of your knowledge, some of your abilities”. Harry also said he was on target. Personally, I think he was very bad in Mathematics…I think he did that all his life. He was a giver …and never missed a chance to offer his help.

He was a very curious person. Harry had the curiosity of a child all his life. He said if you keep your curiosity and imagination, you might become famous some day. He had his share of fame… because he was a curios person. From the price of milk or bread, or…what did you do today questions…nothing slipped away.

Thus, Harry loved to learn something every day. He was a learner. He used to say: Learning is fun. It is a lifetime occupation. As a journalist, I can make a difference in my life and in the lives of others. He said “ in Unity, this is called an AFFIRMATION. If you believe it and you see it, and you say it so many times a day, it becomes part of you.” And he did: through learning and understanding so many different people and different cultures, he managed to make a difference. He was the person who made a difference for my life in so many ways.

Harry was a story teller. His telling stories abilities are unmatched. Regardless of the story, his unique way of putting details and feelings into them was …just catchy. For sure I’m going to miss the: “did I tell you …”

He was a fun person. How many possible answers do you think you can find on “why did the chicken cross the road?” I think Harry knew them all.

Harry was a job lover. Not in the way of being a workaholic, though he worked a lot during his life…more of which was helping others, but he loved his job, whatever that was at the time. He used to tell all students in Romania, when they had to decide what to do further in the future: “Do what you love and the money will follow”. He loved being a journalist, he loved being a PR person, he loved being a professor and he loved being a Unity Minister.

But he was also a life lover. He loved life a lot…he loved what life provided: happiness, challenges. He used to say: This is the first day of the rest of your life.
….
Today is the first day of the rest of our lives. Our lives are now emptier because Harry is not around anymore, but the hole is filled by all the happy memories and teachings we have from Harry.

Happy Birthday, dear Harry! And God’s speed!

Benny J. Morgan
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TRIBUTE TO HARRY W. MORGAN
The World Press Institute, founded by Harry W. Morgan at Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota, where Harry served as the director of the International Center, is his most enduring and successful enterprise. From 1961 onwards, a steady stream of young, outstanding foreign journalists has come to the United States to participate in a program of work, travel and learning about our country and our people in all of our rich diversity.
The World Press Institute fits wonderfully into Harry’s life themes: understanding, friendship, communication and internationalism. From his boyhood in Salinas, traveling first to the United Nations, then to Holland, through the Air Force, and at Rutgers College, he kept involved in these underlying themes, culminating in the Ambassadors for Friendship program.
After graduation, Harry went with his new wife, Catharine, to Macalester in 1960, with the help of DeWitt Wallace, Harry’s lifelong friend and patron. Ambassadors for Friendship recruited foreign students for grass-roots, goodwill tours of the United States, meeting the high and the low, the rich and the poor, “warts and all,” seeing the majestic mountains and prairies, the great cities, the vastness of America—always letting each person make up their own minds about America. This was at the height of the Cold War and attracted many sponsors, host families and volunteers wherever the Ambassadors went. Wallace’s Readers Digest magazine promoted this work in a series of articles on Harry’s work.
From these beginnings emerged the World Press Institute, with Harry reasoning that journalists would multiply the effect of a stay in the United Stares through their media exposure and readers. Each journalist selected, many personally by Harry, would spend a year in the US under the auspices of the Institute including a semester at Macalester living in dorms and with host families, studying American history, politics, culture and journalism. There would be travel throughout the country in the same Rambler Ambassador station wagons George Romney had contributed to Ambassadors for Friendship, now to the WPI. Three months would also be spent working on a large American newspaper, radio station or television news department.
Culminating with a graduation dinner at Macalester and inauguration into the Omega Upsilon Tau (OUT) fraternity, complete with WPI lapel pin and certificate, the WPI would then send off the graduates to their homes and careers, many accelerated by this remarkable America experience.
Over five hundred journalists would have this experience, always evolving in content and time spent, but always within the framework of Harry’s grand idea, to expose foreign press to the fullness of America and let them experience it, not just New York and Washington, which most foreign correspondents rarely left, but the entire country. Journalists portaged canoes in the Boundary Waters of Minnesota, lived on Iowa farms, met with presidents, cabinet secretaries and congressmen, worked on small town media, traveled over ten thousand miles, interviewed hundreds of leaders and ordinary people, and lived our life for a year.
With Harry at the helm, there was always excitement. He could get the impossible interview for the group, complimentary dinners at the interesting restaurants, free hotel rooms from Hilton, invitations to conferences and closed meetings, including national presidential nominating conventions and a whole host of other activities aimed at giving the fifteen “Fellows” insight into the people and processes of the US.
Harry was always inventing, innovating, making the program better. When he met a recent Pulitzer prize winner and learned that the prize consisted of a letter of congratulations and a check, he organized a Pulitzer Prize Winner- WPI Fellow conference at Macalester and invited all of the Pulitzer journalism winners to Macalester for two days of talks between the “best in the US and the best in the world.” This event continued for over fifteen years, creating goodwill and earning national recognition for the program.
The WPI alumni always remained Harry’s friends. He would articulate his belief that the WPI experience was a life-time experience, “personally and professionally” and he kept up active friendships with as many of the alumni as possible, many of whom went on to very distinguished careers in journalism, government and international organizations.
In 1964, Harry began a transition that resulted in his transferring with his wife and two young sons, Howard and Kipper, to New York and a position with the Readers Digest. Harry continued to help select journalists, fund-raise and serve on the Board. In fact, he remained on the Board through the rest of his life, meeting hundreds of journalists participating in the program, scores of Board members and six WPI directors, attending meetings in person and by telephone link-up when he was not in the country. Always ready to take on assignments and offer welcome advice, he continued to be a significant influence on the program.
The World Press Institute, which continues to the present, and has recently announced a renewed and revitalized program, is a living and fitting monument to Harry W. Morgan. His inspiration, guidance and vitality still infuse the WPI with the spirit of friendship and understanding that he so personified. And the results stand as a tribute to his vision that people from different parts of the world can achieve mutual understanding and learn to live in peace. May God bless Harry.
Submitted on behalf of the World Press Institute’s Board of Directors
January 23, 2008